Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription or Fee Access

The Effectiveness of Planned Teaching Programme on Knowledge Regarding “Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose Level” (smbg) Among Diabetic Patients Admitted in Selected Hospitals of Shimoga Taluk

santosh nadig

Abstract


Background: Self-monitoring blood glucose level (smbg) is a key element of home blood glucose Monitoring by people with type-1 and type-2 diabetes mellitus, since approximately 1980, a primary goal of the management of diabetes mellitus is to achieve blood sugar level closer to normal level as much as possible, guided by hbgm several times of smbg in a week benefits included medical cost, a reduction in the occurrence rate and severity of long term complication from hyperglycaemia as well as reduction in the short term potentially life threatening complications of hypoglycaemia. Numerous trials have been carried out to determine the true impact of smbg on glycaemic control. Some, including randomized, controlled trials, have demonstrated the efficacy of smbg. Among patients with type 1 diabetes, smbg has been associated with improved health outcomes. Specifically, increasing frequency of smbg was linearly correlated with reductions in hba1c among type 1 patients.
Hence the present study is conducted to assess the effectiveness of planned teaching programme on knowledge regarding self-monitoring blood glucose among diabetic patients in admitted in selected hospitals of shimoga taluk. Statement of the problem: The effectiveness of planned teaching programme on knowledge regarding “self- monitoring of blood glucose level “(smbg) among diabetic patients admitted in selected hospitals of shimoga taluk. Objectives of the study: The objectives of the study were to: Assess the pretest knowledge regarding self-monitoring of blood glucose level among diabetic patients. Evaluate the effectiveness of planned teaching programme on knowledge regarding self-monitoring of blood glucose level among diabetic patients. Find out the association between the pretest knowledge score and selected demographic variables among diabetic patients. Methods: An evaluative approach was used for the study to test the effectiveness of planned teaching programme prepared for diabetic patients. The conceptual framework adopted for the study was based on “general systems model” for the development of learning modules as adopted from the bertalanffy, 1968, a guide for development, utilisation and evaluation. To obtain content validity of the tool, the prepared tool along with the problem statement, objectives, operational definition, inclusion and exclusion criteria, and structured interview schedule along with the demographic proforma, planned teaching programme were submitted to nine experts. Seven were from the field of medical surgical nursing speciality and two were doctors in the field of general medicine. To ensure the reliability, the tool was administered to 6 diabetic patients in selected hospitals in shimoga taluk (annexure 1) who fulfilled the sampling criteria, reliability coefficient of the tool tested using split half method following spearman brown prophecy formula. The reliability quotient was found to be r (6) 0.93 for structured interview schedule. This indicated that the tool is reliable. Nonprobability purposive sampling technique was used to select the sample for the study. The sample size was 60. Pilot study was conducted to find out the feasibility of the study. Data collected from the sample were analysed by descriptive and inferential statistics. Significant findings of the study: Findings of the study demonstrated that 75% of the respondents belongs to the age group of 51–60 years, 80% of respondents were males, 63.3% were Hindu, 68.3% belonged to nuclear families, 41.7% had primary schooling, 35% of respondents occupation is agriculture, 38.3% had income of rupees 10.001–15.000, 46.7% of the respondents had diabetes illness >2 years, 60% had history of diabetes mellitus in his/her family, and 75% had previous knowledge regarding smbg among them 77.8% had previous knowledge by health professionals. The mean percentage of pretest knowledge score was 30.76%, whereas posttest knowledge score was 92.30%. The ‘t’ value computed between mean pretest and posttest knowledge score is statistically significant (t (cal) = 46.123, table value t (59) = 1.67, p<0.05) and ‘t’ value computed between pretest and posttest knowledge score is statistically significant (t (cal) =46.123 table value t (59) = 1.67, p <0.05). This shows that there is significant difference between the mean pretest and posttest knowledge score and mean pretest and posttest score of diabetic patients regarding smbg, it shows that planned teaching programme (ptp) was effective in increasing the knowledge of diabetic patients regarding smbg. Thus, it showed that as the knowledge increased technique improved. The findings of the study revealed that there was no association between pretest knowledge score and selected demographic variables. Conclusion: The findings of the study showed that the planned teaching programme was effective in all the areas in improving the knowledge of diabetic patients regarding smbg.

Full Text:

PDF

References


B. Basavanthappa. Medical-Surgical Nursing. 1st Edn., 2005, 687p.

Www.wikepediancyclopedia.com blood glucose monitoring.

Evan m, benjanin, m.d., facp, self-monitoring of blood glucose, clinical. Diabetesjouranal.org.

T. Thacker, incidence and prevalence of diabetes in india, diabetes. Www.indian express.com/ news/number of diabetes patients in india /531240.wed.oct.21.2009.

W. Fisher, T. Kohut, H. Schachner, P. Stinger. Understanding self-monitoring of blood glucose among individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes: on information-motivational-behavioural skills analysis, Canada 2011 jan-feb;37(1):85-44p.

Http://clinical.diabetesjournals.org/content/20/1/45.ful.

Www.idf.org.

Incidence and prevalence of diabetes in india, diabetes – global epidemic, www.google.com.

Smbg, http://clinical,diabetes journals.org/content/20/1/45.ful.

W. Fisher, T. Kohut, H. Schachner, P. Stinger. Understanding self-monitoring of blood glucose among individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes: on information-motivational-behavioural skills analysis, Canada. 2011; 37(1): 85-44p.

C. Ezenwaka, A. Olukoga, P. Onuoha, R. Worrell, T. skinner, H. Mayers, E. Martin, C. Phillip. The diabetes & metabolism research group, Trinidad, Archphsial Biochem. 2012; 118(1): 16–21p.

T. Kamoi, K. Minagawa, S. Kimura, K. Kobayashi. Patient perceptions of different lancing sites for self-monitoring of blood glucose: diabetes science technological. 2010; 4p.

Breatlanfy theory for conceptual work.

Df. Polit, B.P. Hunger. Nursing Research, Principles and Methods. 3rd Edn. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company; 2004.

O.A. Al-khawaldeh, M.A. Al-Hassan, E.S. Froelicher. Self-efficacy, self-management, and glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus, Diabetes Educ. 2012; 26(1): 10–6p.

C.E. Ezenwaka, A. Olukoga, P. Onuoha, R. Worrell, T. Skinner, H. Mayers, E. Martin, C Phillip. The diabetes & metabolism research group, Trinidad, Archphsial Biochem. 2012: 118(1): 16–21p.


Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.